• A good Probiotic a day keep may keep the bugs away! Compromised gut bacteria may be as a result of long-term constipation or a course of antibiotics. There are many other reasons too. My probiotic of choice is: AIM FloraFood. In my opinion, the BEST probiotic out there! Try it!
  • Variety is the key! I have found that eating a variety of whole fruits and vegetables give the body a wider spectrum of nutrients. Eating more raw fruits and veggies will also help to keep the body nourished and functioning better.
  • A good reminder for us all as we eat our healthy food this week, is to chew our food thoroughly before swallowing. In this way saliva enzymes make contact with food long enough to begin the digestive process.
  • Try avoiding pesticides and insecticides as best you can. There is evidence that these can have a negative impact on the endocrine system as well as disrupting many other systems in the body. Ever wondered which fruit and veggies are clean and which are dirty? Find out here.
  • The Omega 3 fats also known as Essential Fatty Acids ( chiaseeds, green leafy veg, hemp seeds) are vital to your endocrine system. They also aid in the lubrication of the colon and support beneficial gut bacteria.
  • Enjoy citrus fruits such as limes, lemons, oranges and grapefruit. They are high in vitamin C which helps carry toxins out of the body.
  • Eating more leafy greens is powerful stuff! Considered adding a handful of greens to your daily smoothie? drinking a green juice daily (I love AIM’s Barley Life), and a daily salad bursting with greens. Greens are a rich source of chlorophyll, which acts as a detoxifier in the body. Chlorophyll also helps the blood to deliver oxygen to all the cells of the body as well as helping to neutralize free radicals that cause damage to cells. If you suffer from bad breath or body odors, chlorophyll to the rescue—it is a natural deodorizer! Remember chlorophyll is natures house cleaner!
  • Drink your water! Making up about 60% of your body weight, water is vitally important for every system in the body. If you aren’t properly hydrated, all your cleansing efforts will be compromised. Water is so necessary during digestion that 2.11 gallons rush to the stomach to help the digestive process, and then return to body tissues afterwards.
  • Focusing on eating fiber-rich foods with lots of raw fruits and vegetables help to strengthen digestion so that those that are cleansing can assimilate nutrients more effectively.
  • Eating 2 servings of cruciferous veggies daily will boost your intake of sulforaphane which boosts production of glutathione. Eg's: Kale, cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts and broccoli sprouts.
  • AIM CellSparc 360 is a superior coenzyme Q10 formula, combining coenzyme Q10, tocotrienols, and omega-3 fatty acids in a convenient softgel capsule. Check it out here.
  • Incorporate fresh leafy greens into your daily diet, sneak them into smoothies, quiches, use a variety of greens as a base when making a salad.
  • Think twice about reaching for that junk food this weekend. It may taste good momentarily, but your heart won't benefit at all! Read more here.
  • Examples of processed meats include; hot dogs, sausages, salami, ham, bologna and other deli meats. These all contain salt, fat, cholesterol and preservatives like nitrites and nitrates etc. Read more about studies done here. Try replacing processed meat on sandwiches with fresh baby spinach, avocado and sprouts, hummus or incorporate lentils into your salad.
  • If your cholesterol levels are too high, fatty deposits may be building up on your artery walls, making it more difficult for blood to flow to and from your heart, which may eventually increase your risk of heart attack. Help keep cholesterol under control by making sure that you fill up on these cholesterol-busting foods: Oats and beans – contain soluble fibre, which helps to stop cholesterol levels from building up in your blood; nuts and oily fish – contain healthy fats which help to lower your level of ‘bad’ cholesterol; and food fortified with sterols and stanols – these substances occur naturally in small doses in many plants and help to prevent your body from absorbing cholesterol.
  • Source: Harvard Health Publications
  • Chances are that when you chow down on a blueberry scone or muffin from your favorite coffee and latte shop, your heart is taking second place in the relationship. Most of these grab and go treaty sweet foods are bursting with sodium, sugar, fat and cholesterol levels that exceed the recommended daily values for these nutrients. Dump it and go for the better grain - steel cut oats with real blueberries! Soak your steel cut oats the night before and it will cook in no time in the morning. Top with blueberries, place in a flask and you are good to go!
  • Spoil your loved one without spoiling their heart. Chocolate with a high-cocoa content (at least 70%) contains special plant nutrients called flavonoids, which help your body to resist damage caused by free radical and may protect your heart. Dark chocolate also contains resveratrol, a compound that's been found to lower blood sugar.
  • Fats differ vastly in terms of their impact on blood cholesterol levels- Trans fatty acids are formed when oils become hydrogenated (hardened) to make margarine. It is thought to increase blood cholesterol levels, so I encourage you to avoid the use of hard margarines as well as processed foods containing these fats. Examples are: Some biscuits, cookies, pies and cakes.
  • Did you have an egg for breakfast this morning? Boiled, fried, scrambled, poached?
  • Despite popular belief that eggs should not be eaten because of its high cholesterol content, eggs are not only a great source of protein, but also a valuable provider of essential fats and brain nutrients. To keep the nutrients intact and limit damage during cooking, boil your eggs, rather than frying them.
  • Sprinkle a tablespoon or two of raw nuts and seeds over your salads, and in your stir fries and other veggie dishes. They are bursting with mono-unsaturated fats and help lower blood cholesterol levels and improve HDL levels.
  • Replace coffee and regular tea with rooibos tea, which has been shown to reduce heart disease risk by slowing down hardening of the arteries.
  • I would encourage folks to have blood cholesterol and blood pressure check ups at least once a year at your annual check up. These simple tests really do help to identify heart disease at an earlier stage.
  • Replace refined carbohydrates with ancient grains like quinoa, millet and try black rice - delicious.
  • Liven up your salads with a few raw nuts and seeds.
  • Exchange instant, high sugar oatmeal for old-fashioned oatmeal or steel cut oats.
  • Snack on fresh fruit (an apple, pear, strawberries or blueberries) between meals with 6-12 almonds.
  • Eat more leafy greens: try a kale salad or make a quiche using Swiss chard and use baby spinach and darker lettuce varieties in your salads.
  • Add more raw veggies to your diet; try a veggie you have never eaten before.
  • Consume an omega 3 fatty acid today. The essential fats in flax, chia, hemp seed, walnuts, pumpkin seeds and oily fish (mackeral, herring, sardines, salmon) have been shown to reduce inflammation and fight heart disease. They also have great anti-aging benefits and nourish the brain!
  • Parents, lead by example. Parental participation plays a vital role, since parents have a strong influence on the food selections of young children and family members.
  • Boost immune system by adding more raw fruits and vegetables.
  • When the family gets hungry just before dinner time, cut up sticks of celery, red bell pepper, cucumber, cherry tomatoes, raw broccoli or the raw veggies they like and serve it with some homemade hummus or avocado pear dip.
  • Have bowls of raw fruit, nuts, seeds and unsulphered, unsweetened dried fruit readily available on the kitchen counter.
  • Encourage and teach children to drink water, water, water! This lays a great foundation when they get older.
  • When mucus is present in the body, control intake of milk and dairy products.
  • Keep the treaty sweety snacks for the weekend – try to eat good natural, wholesome foods and snacks during the week.
  • What fat have you fed your child’s brain today? Never mind your own. Make sure family members are getting in the right amounts of Essential Fatty Acids!
  • Keep the unhealthy stuff out of the house – avoid being tempted. If you have it the family will want it.
  • Avoid high-calorie foods such as sodas, candies and desserts.
  • Avoid eating out too much. It's a lot harder to make healthy choices and control portion size when eating out.
  • Get the family moving. Especially during winter months. Get into a daily habit of going for a brisk walk or bike ride. When you get your children exercising, you are helping them make deposit’s of bone into their “bone bank” and maintain their weight.
  • Eating junk food occasionally is still okay, but if it is a regular habit, you need to look at ways to break the habit.
  • Expose your children to as many foods as possible. This helps a child not to be a picky eater.
  • Parents, take control. Parents are responsible for putting healthy foods into the kitchen and leaving the unhealthy foods at the store.
  • Buy raw almond butter or unsweetened peanut butter.
  • Buy jams that are sweetened with fruit juice and not sugar and fructose corn syrup.
  • Choose breakfast cereals with a low sugar content.
  • Replace artificial sweeteners with Xylitol and Stevia or natural, raw honey.
  • Limit additives, preservatives, colorants, chemical etc… in food. The bugs don’t even eat them, then why do we?
  • Limit caffeine – large doses cause excessive excretion of calcium and magnesium, both important for strong bones.
  • Limit hydrogenated fat in margarine, sausage, processed meats and convenience meals – these interfere with metabolism of some EFA’s and can cause high cholesterol in toddlers.
  • Limit salt found in canned and processed foods, chips and crisps – too much salt is associated with high blood pressure.
  • Limit refined sugar found in cakes, cookies and white bread – as Dr Ann say’s “The great whites”. These deplete the body of vital nutrients and the body has to produce more insulin to cope with it.